Infographic: Thai junta leader to cut short ‘boring’ Friday night rants

Originally published at Siam Voices on June 1, 2015

A screencap of Thai military junta leader and Prime Minister General Prayuth Chan-ocha's weekly TV address "Returning Happiness to the Nation's People".
A screencap of Thai military junta leader and Prime Minister General Prayuth Chan-ocha’s weekly TV address “Returning Happiness to the Nation’s People”.

As Thai military junta leader General Prayuth Chan-ocha considers shortening his weekly TV addresses, we look how much air time he has already racked up.

Every Friday evening, the dulcet tones of synthesized strings of a pop ballad ring in the program that has been a mainstay on Thai television for a year now, and a man starts talking and talking… and talking about the work he has done in the past week. The weekly spot is part of the Thai military government’s media propaganda routine, replacing the much-loved soap operas that are usually shown at this time.

Since the military coup of May 22, 2014, as part of the junta’s efforts to “Return Happiness” to the Thai people in order to win backs the hearts and minds it has continuously intimidated, Thai junta leader and Prime Minister General Prayuth Chan-ocha appears every Friday night at around 8.3opm to address the nation in his show “Returning Happiness to the Nation’s People” (“คืนความสุข ให้คนในชาติ”).

Weekly programs where Thai prime ministers provide updates about the work of their government are not a novelty, as previous civilian governments have done so before. The main difference is that their programs ran on Sunday on one state-owned TV station. Gen. Prayuth on the other hand appears on nearly all Thai free TV channels on Friday evening, a time slot normally reserved for the “lakorns”, the soap operas that are hugely popular, but can also be rather questionable – so questionable, in fact, that Gen. Prayuth himself offered to write some new scripts himself.

On the program – which is pre-recorded in front of a green screen – Gen. Prayuth discusses the week’s progress of his administration on a variety of issues. On some episodes, he’s joined by other members of the junta or the cabinet to provide their updates. But more often than not, his rapid-fire remarks veer off-script into bizarre side notes and furious tirades (so much so that the English subtitles hardly keep up with him), further cementing his mercurial rhetoric and his compulsive loquaciousness.

And more often than not, his weekly addresses vary in length, but tend to be on the longer side, as our infographic shows:

CLICK TO VIEW INFOGRAPHIC HERE

Those times are soon coming to an end though, or at least they appear to be cut short:

Prime Minister General Prayut Chan-o-cha is considering cutting the length of his weekly national address by half and may move it out of the prime-time slot. Prayut said yesterday he would try to keep his speech to about 30 minutes during the programme […]

When asked if he watched the pre-recorded programme, the prime minister said: “I do and I feel bored.”

Prayut to rethink time and length of his weekly TV show“, The Nation, May 29, 2015

While the junta leader is seemingly omnipresent on TV, it is not known if a lot of people are actually tuning to hear his words of “wisdom” – it could be possible that the majority actually doesn’t watch, most likely in disappointment at being deprived of their beloved “lakorns”. And TV executives aren’t really happy about this either, considering that these shows score the highest ratings and contribute to the largest advertising revenues:

“It was popular during the first few weeks, but since it’s been a year now, it has lost its appeal,” Sirote Klampaiboon, an independent scholar and TV host, said last week. Forcing all channels to relay the programme could be considered as monopolising information, Sirote said. (…)

The programme, which usually drags on for more than an hour, has impacted the TV industry, he said. The operators all paid a fortune to bid for a spot on the digital TV platform last year in the hope that they could create content and attract viewers. Undoubtedly, airtime was valuable, he said. The operators held the rights to exploit the resources they had paid for, but the programme hosted by the premier prevented them from doing so, he added.

Not every TV viewer is happy with Prayut ‘Returning Happiness to the People’“, The Nation, May 31, 2015

In a related development, the military government’s daily TV show “Thailand Moves Forward”, also aired on all state-owned channels, is getting another 15 minutes of air time.

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